Highest resolution image of the Sun taken by the Solar Orbiter (SolO) satellite of the European Space Agency (ESA), to which Prof. Louise Harra and colleagues at ETH Zurich contributed. Courtesy of the ESA/EUV Imagers team.
Highest resolution image of the Sun taken by the Solar Orbiter (SolO) satellite of the European Space Agency (ESA), to which Prof. Louise Harra and colleagues at ETH Zurich contributed. Courtesy of the ESA/EUV Imagers team.

Media Impact! Swiss initiative for Space and Biodiversity

Seven journalists cover Swiss innovations that are leading the world. Enjoy the latest news from Switzerland!

In April 2024, the Embassy of Switzerland in Japan organized a media trip with seven leading Japanese media outlets for a 3rd Vitality.Swiss media trip with a focus on Swiss research and development in “space” and “biodiversity.” Find here some of the articles that will give you the latest insight of Swiss Innovation.

Switzerland is well-known in Japan for its cheese, chocolate, and beautiful landscapes, but there is also a rising awareness around Swiss pioneering innovation capabilities. To accelerate this trend, seven major Japanese media outlets were invited to participate in a press tour in the spring of 2024, focusing on "space" and "biodiversity," covering all three Vitality.Swiss program theme, "Innovation," "Healthy Life," and "Sustainability." The media trip coordinated by the Embassy and Presence Switzerland highlighted various Swiss initiatives in the space & biodiversity sectors.

Report from the HuffPost Japan

AgriCircle CEO Peter Fröhlich (right) : “...how can we create agricultural change without being bound by conventional ‘common sense’? Mr. Frehlich's focus was on the cross-fertilization of space technology and local data. ...” text from an article by Maya Nakata/HuffPost Japan. Photo by AgriCircle
AgriCircle CEO Peter Fröhlich (right) : “…how can we create agricultural change without being bound by conventional ‘common sense’? Mr. Frehlich’s focus was on the cross-fertilization of space technology and local data. …” text from an article by Maya Nakata/HuffPost Japan. Photo by AgriCircle

HuffPost Japan is an “agenda-setting media” that picks up the voices and thoughts of individuals in addition to current news related to politics, economics, culture, lifestyle, etc. It is also a “media that generates conversation” that focuses on features and opinion articles.

Maya Nakata, a reporter who participated in this tour, has published three articles on HuffPost.

In “Regenerative Agriculture with Space Technology. Swiss Startup Challenges Bottom-up Agricultural Transformation,” she reports in detail on the Swiss startup AgriCircle's efforts for ‘farmer-centered’ transformation.

Her article, “Endangered Crane Nests Halved, Satellite Data Reveals Impact of Climate Crisis,” follows the activities of Professor Gabriela Schaepman-Strub and her colleagues at the University of Zurich, who use sanitary data to study threats to biodiversity (the target is the Siberian Crane, which has been sighted in Japan).

Her last article, titled “Hayabusa's Challenge Couldn't Have Been Done in the US, features an interview with Professor Thomas Zabouken of ETH Zurich, also known as “Dr. Z” of the space world (former Deputy Director of NASA's Science Mission Directorate). She describes Professor Zabouken's expectations for Japanese space start-ups and the importance of international cooperation.

Read the full articles on the HuffPost Japan website (link below).
Regenerative Agriculture with Space Technology. Swiss Startup Challenges Bottom-up Agricultural Transformation (May 19, 2024 11:01 JST|Updated May 20, 2024)
Endangered Crane Nests Halved, Satellite Data Reveals Impact of Climate Crisis (May 22, 2024 08:00 JST)
Hayabusa's Challenge Couldn't Have Been Done in the US (June 2, 2024 11:00 JST)

Report from the Sankei Shimbun

The Sphinx Observatory at the Jungfraujoch Institute, which “supports climate and environmental research around the world” from the text of the article. Photo: © Jungfrau railway
The Sphinx Observatory at the Jungfraujoch Institute, which “supports climate and environmental research around the world” from the text of the article. Photo: © Jungfrau railway

The Sankei Shimbun was one of the first of Japan's five major newspapers to develop an Internet and digital news business.

The Close-Up Science section of the May 19, 2024 edition of the paper featured prominently the contribution of the Jungfraujoch High Altitude Research Institute, which exists at an altitude of 3,500 Meters above sea level in Switzerland, to research supporting the world's climate and environment.
Swiss High Altitude Research Institute Contributes to the World Atmospheric Observation of All of Europe at an Altitude of 3,500 meters (Published in Print on May 19, 2024, Distributed Digitally on May 12, 2024)

Maki Matsuda, a reporter who interviewed the institute, introduced the fact that the institute has worked on about 50 projects in six months, more than 100 observation targets, and measures more than 70 gases to monitor the atmosphere. She also mentions the measurement of the Aletsch Glacier, the largest glacier in the Alps near the institute, and research on aerosols. The article positions the institute as a key player in a global observation network that also contributes to national climate policies.

Other articles include an article on the space exploration robot being worked on by ETH Zurich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich). Furthermore, an article touching on Switzerland's commitment to science education from an early age as well as an article about a satellite to be launched in 2008 to elucidate the mystery of solar flares and observe the sun's atmosphere with high precision.

Please read the full article in the Sankei Shimbun newspaper or Sankei News (limited to some paid members).
Swiss High Altitude Research Institute Contributing to the World Atmospheric Observations across Europe at an Altitude of 3,500 meters (2024/5/12 06:00)
Three-Legged Leap on the Moon and Asteroids What is the New Form of Space Exploration Robots (2024/5/18 06:00)
How to increase the number of science-loving children? (2024/5/5 08:00)

Satellite to be Launched in 2008 to Elucidate the Mystery of Solar Flares and Observe the Sun's Atmosphere with High Precision

https://www.sankei.com/article/20240602-SDIW3JDXBZMWDCT5SVPZW4PLXU/?866017 (2024/6/2 06:00)

Report from the Nikkan Kogyo Shimbun (THE DAILY INDUSTRIAL NEWS)

Space components made in the workshop room at the University of Bern. They are used in various space missions.” Text and photo credit: Nikkan Kogyo Shimbun, May 22, 2024, ‘Deep Cross Section/Space Development, Swiss Technology Shines, Contributing to ESA in Europe.’
Space components made in the workshop room at the University of Bern. They are used in various space missions.” Text and photo credit: Nikkan Kogyo Shimbun, May 22, 2024, ‘Deep Cross Section/Space Development, Swiss Technology Shines, Contributing to ESA in Europe.’

The Nikkan Kogyo Shimbun is a comprehensive newspaper specializing in industry, on both macro and micro aspects of corporate activities and business.
Mamiko Iida, a reporter from the Science and Technology Department of the Nikkan Kogyo Shimbun who is particularly knowledgeable about the space field, wrote an article titled “Strong Cooperation with JAXA...Swiss Technology Shines in Space Development,” where she highlighted the following three points:
- Swiss technology is a behind-the-scenes approach: Cooperation with JAXA on solar observation satellites, participation of universities in Mercury exploration
- High quality maintained by the “craftsmanship” of local companies, used in the H3 fairing
- International collaboration in climate change research, etc., supported by the government

To read the full article, please click here, or visit the Nikkan Kogyo Shimbun print or/and their electronic editions.

Please read the other 8 articles in the Nikkan Kogyo Shimbun print and electronic editions (All in Japanese):
Swiss Forest, Snow, Ice and Landscape Research Institute develops environmental DNA collection drone as biodiversity research tool (2024/5/24 05:00)
University of Bern: Deformation of celestial bodies by crashing spacecraft: an option for Earth's defense (4/22/2024 05:00)
ETH Zurich: New mechanism for displaying Earth's water cycle using data from observation satellites (2024/4/22 05:00)
University of Bern unveils vibration test of a device that withstands vibration in space, to be mounted on the next Mars orbiter (2024/4/19 05:00)
Former NASA Deputy Administrator Zurbuchen speaks at ETH Zurich (2024/4/18 05:00)
ETH Zurich Unveils Space Exploration Robot Under Development (2024/4/18 05:00)ETH Zurich to Participate in JAXA-led Solar Observation Project (2024/4/18 05:00)
Beyond Gravity Switzerland unveils fairing of H3 rocket (2024/4/17 05:00)

Report from the Mainichi Shimbun

A researcher at the University of Bern, who has been responsible for the research and development of the JUICE spacecraft, which will observe Jupiter's satellites. Photo by In Tanaka, Mainichi Newspapers, from her article
A researcher at the University of Bern, who has been responsible for the research and development of the JUICE spacecraft, which will observe Jupiter’s satellites. Photo by In Tanaka, Mainichi Newspapers, from her article “Switzerland, a strong presence in space development.”

The Mainichi Shimbun was the pioneer of the first daily newspaper in Tokyo (1872) and the world's first newspaper to be delivered door-to-door in 1875.

In its May 9, 2024 print edition and May 7, 2024 digital edition, the paper reported extensively on Switzerland's efforts to become a “Space Nation” driven by its advanced technology and research capabilities, especially in universities. Reporter In Tanaka, who covered the story, paid particular attention to Switzerland's background of “ambitious student-led research” and “bottom-up space development” in her commentary. The article provides an easy-to-understand summary of Switzerland's space efforts.

Please take a look at the full article (some parts are paid articles).
Switzerland's Presence in Space Development: University Research Strength in the Background (2024/05/07 19:03)

Report from Nikkei xTECH

Emmen, in the canton of Lucerne, Switzerland, is a town with the Alps in the distance. The key components of Japan's domestically produced H3 rocket are actually manufactured at a factory in Emmen.  Text and images are from Nikkei X Tech “H3 Rocket Components Actually Made in Switzerland, Sneaking Into Factory for Short-Term Production”
Emmen, in the canton of Lucerne, Switzerland, is a town with the Alps in the distance. The key components of Japan’s domestically produced H3 rocket are actually manufactured at a factory in Emmen. Text and images are from Nikkei X Tech “H3 Rocket Components Actually Made in Switzerland, Sneaking Into Factory for Short-Term Production”

Nikkei Crosstech (xTECH) is a technology-oriented digital medium for engineers and business leaders in a variety of industries, from IT, automotive, electronics, and machinery to architecture and civil engineering.

During this media trip, journalist Ryunosuke Kubota discovered that the key components of Japan's domestic rocket “H3” were actually made in Switzerland! Please read the report on this surprising fact! This is an easy-to-understand, yet detailed report that is well worth reading, even for readers with no expertise in the field. (Some parts are available only to paying members.)

H3 Rocket Components Actually Made in Switzerland, Sneaking Into the Factory Where They Were Manufactured for a Short Time (2024.05.17)

Story’s cover:
Highest resolution image of the Sun taken by the Solar Orbiter (SolO) satellite of the European Space Agency (ESA), to which Prof. Louise Harra and colleagues at ETH Zurich contributed. Courtesy of the ESA/EUV Imagers team.